Breast feeding

You’ve made it through your first 24 hours as a new mom. Maybe you have other children, but you are a new mom all over again…and now it is your baby’s second night.
All of a sudden, your little one discovers that he’s no longer back in the warm and comfortable – albeit a bit crowded – womb where he has spent the last 8 ½ or 9 months – and it is SCARY out here! He isn’t hearing your familiar heartbeat, the swooshing of the placental arteries, the soothing sound of your lungs or the comforting gurgling of your intestines. Instead, he’s in a crib, swaddled in a diaper, a tee-shirt, a hat and a blanket. All sorts of people have been handling him, and he’s not yet become accustomed to the new noises, lights, sounds and smells. He has found one thing though, and that’s his voice….and you find that each time you take him off the breast where he comfortably drifted off to sleep, and put him in the bassinet – he protests, loudly!
In fact, each time you put him back on the breast he nurses for a little bit and then goes to sleep. As you take him off and put him back to bed – he cries again… and starts rooting around, looking for you. This goes on – seemingly for hours. A lot of moms are convinced it is because their milk isn’t “in” yet, and the baby is starving. However, it isn’t that, but the baby’s sudden awakening to the fact that the most comforting and comfortable place for him to be is at the breast.

It’s the closest to “home” he can get. It seems that this is pretty universal among babies – lactation consultants all over the world have noticed the same thing.

Making the decision to breastfeed is a personal matter. It’s also one that’s likely to draw strong opinions from friends and family.

Many medical authorities, including the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, strongly recommend breastfeeding. But you and your baby are unique, and the decision is up to you.
A team of researchers from the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel-Aviv University has published a paper on the role breastfeeding plays in the development of a child’s ADHD in later life. The research itself was designed to examine this relationship and their finding clearly indicate that periods of longer exclusive breastfeeding, specifically six months or more, is negatively correlated to the emergence of ADHD later in the child’s life.
The research team was under the leadership of Aviva Mimouni-Bloch, MD, and their work was published in Breastfeeding Medicine.

Read more at: http://www.joomag.com/magazine/vol1-virtual-magazine-issue2/0138260001444492547

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